Internships with the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology: 2019–2020

Helping Address Significant Challenges Facing Our World

The Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology (BARA) is a unique research institution whose mission is to apply the principles and methods of social science toward the understanding and alleviation of world problems. BARA hosts interns who are in the middle and advanced stages of their undergraduate education or in the early stages of their graduate program, have demonstrated superior ability in their coursework, and wish to apply their knowledge and skills to an actual problem. Internship initiatives are proposed by community leaders who seek to address particular challenges within their organizations and/or communities.

Most internships are offered for academic credit for a full academic year, though some one-semester opportunities are available. Internships are open to students who have at least a junior standing and at least a 3.2 grade point average; excellent writing skills are required as well. Additionally, individuals may hold an internship position in the semester immediately following their graduation. BARA interns work directly with research faculty and post-doctoral researchers and may work individually or on a project team. Within the internship initiatives, internships are tailored to the goals of each individual. Interns gain professional experience and present the results of their work in campus seminars, professional society meetings, and publications. Interns may be employed beyond their internship as warranted by their performance and project requirements.

Click the button on the left to download an application. For more information on the internship program, contact Kevin Bulletts at the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology at bulletts@email.arizona.edu.

SUBMIT INTERNSHIP APPLICATIONS FOR THE FALL 2019 SEMESTER BY AUGUST 12.

Reducing Food Insecurity and Promoting Food Justice in Southeastern Arizona

The Community Food Bank (CFB) of Southern Arizona takes an innovative approach to reducing food insecurity for the more than 50,000 children and families who are at risk for hunger in Southern Arizona. Together with a broad host of partner organizations, the staff of the CFB brings emergency food relief to thousands of area residents each month. At the same time however, the CFB seeks deeper and longer-term solutions to improve health and nutrition of its clients and to address the underlying poverty and inequities that generate food insecurity and hunger in our region. In 2019-2020, working with CFB and BARA staff, BARA interns will engage with CFB clients to better understand how they meet their need for food and the options available to them in their neighborhoods. Specific activities include working with clients and CFB staff to develop appropriate research instruments and to design and carry out interviews and focus groups. Interns will learn how to place their research findings in the context of local and national food policies and practices and will present their research findings in a written report as well as a presentation for CFB staff and clients. There is no foreign language requirement for this project, but Spanish speakers will have the opportunity to use their language skills to help us reach as wide an audience as possible.

Using Digital Archaeology and Virtual Education to Preserve a Fragile Urban Archaeological Site

The University Indian Ruin Archaeological Research District is a 13-acre historic property located in the northeastern Tucson basin. The District encompasses the central part of a Classic period Hohokam village occupied between A.D. 1150 and 1450 and a complex of archaeological research facilities constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps between 1935 and 1937. Dorothy A. Knipe donated the core of the property to the University of Arizona in 1934 for archaeological investigation and public outreach. The University of Arizona’s mission in managing University Indian Ruin (UIR) is preservation, training of students, and public education and outreach. The purpose of this project is to explore digital archaeology and virtual education as a mechanism for balancing the simultaneous preservation of a fragile archaeological site that is today surrounded by urban development with archaeological research, student training, and public education and outreach. In 2019-2020, working with faculty and staff from the UA School of Anthropology, Northern Arizona University Anthropology, Arizona State Museum, and other museums in the area; residents near the UIR; and local educators, BARA interns will receive training in oral history and archival research and will help develop the online research and education program. Specific activities include gathering data and materials, conducting oral history interviews with people knowledgeable about the site, and developing K-12 educational materials appropriate for schools and youth programs in the Tucson basin. Interns also will learn data management techniques and transcription and will share their research findings in written text for a project website and through presentations in at least one public forum. There is no foreign language requirement for this project.

Reducing Energy Poverty and Promoting Energy Equity through Solar Technology in Arizona-Sonora

Renewable energy has been identified as key for sustainable growth, and despite heavy subsidies of fossil fuels by governments around the world, including the United States and Mexico, there has been a record level of growth in renewable energy in the past decade. In 2015, the total investment in renewable power and fuels in developing countries exceeded that in developed economies, marking a key turning point in the sustainability of these alternatives. The potential for solar energy at the Arizona- Sonora border is tremendous, providing an important alternative to fossil fuels. However, to date, much of that potential is being realized in large-scale projects that may not benefit local populations. And, although Arizona ranks 2nd in the U.S. for the number of solar installations, most solar panels are found in high income communities where residents can afford the up-front costs or have the credit rating to take on a lease. The end result is that solar technologies disproportionately benefit wealthier residents. In 2019-2020, interns will work with community organizations in Tucson to investigate whether solar mini splits will lower household energy bills and increase thermal comfort, what behavioral changes result from people living in households with installed solar mini splits, and the conditions under which a solar loan program would be feasible and attractive to low-income families. They will receive training and direct experience in social science research methods, take interview and field notes, administer surveys, develop databases and analyze data, and place their research findings in the context of current U.S. and Mexico energy policies and practices. Interns also will participate in community forums and advisory board meetings. They will present their research findings in at least one public forum. Interns must have at least basic Spanish language skills and will have the opportunity to develop and use them.

Documenting Worker Experiences to Promote Safety in the Offshore Oil and Gas Industry

Since the late 1990s, BARA researchers have investigated the myriad ways - economic, social, cultural, environmental - that the offshore oil and gas industry impacts residents and communities along the coast of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. In 2019-2020, the researchers and interns will work with community leaders and researchers in southern Louisiana to document worker experiences to promote safety in the offshore oil and gas industry and place those experiences in the context of oil price fluctuations, retirements, and population shifts in this region. Interns will receive training and direct experience in social science research methods, participate in virtual project and advisory board meetings, take interview and meeting notes, develop databases and analyze data, and place their research findings in the historical and current context of labor and the petroleum industry in the Gulf Coast region. They will present their research findings in at least one public forum. There is no foreign language requirement for this project.

Improving Transitions to Adulthood for Young People with Disabilities

The transition to adulthood can be challenging for all young people and their families, including young people with disabilities. The University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities in Arizona, known as the Sonoran UCEDD, was established in 2006 to ensure that individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities have the supports they need to fully take part in the life of our community; through its Youth to Adult Transition program it helps youth and their families navigate this process. In 2019-2020, BARA researchers and interns will work with the Sonoran UCEDD, several local school districts, and people and organizations who serve young adults with disabilities to investigate options and outcomes for youth and young people who transition from school to adult programs. Interns will receive training and direct experience in social science research methods, take interview and field notes, develop databases and analyze data, and place their research findings in the context of current policies and practices related to support for young people while they are still in school and once they enter the adult system. They will present their research findings in at least one public forum. There is no foreign language requirement for this project.

Bridging the Border and Fostering Community by Documenting Experiences of Pilgrimage

The Juan Bautista de Anza Historic Trail connects history, culture, and outdoor recreation from Nogales, Arizona, to the San Francisco Bay Area. Parts of the trail are used along the pilgramage route from San Xavier del Bac on the southern edge of Tucson to Magdalena de Kino in Sonora, Mexico. This pilgramage is taken annually to pay homage to “St. Francis” on or around the October 4 feast day and attracts diverse peoples--Mayo, Yaqui, O’odham, Mexican, Hispanic American and Anglo Americanas. BARA researchers and interns will assist the Border Community Alliance,an organization based in Tubac, AZ dedicated to “bridging the border and fostering community through education, collaboration and cultural exchange,” in gathering data for an interpretative project for the National Park Service. Interns will participate in the pilgrimage by walking or riding, observing and interviewing other pilgrims along the route. They will share ther observations and interpretations in a public panel presentation and written summary. Interns will receive training and direct experience in social science research methods, take interview and field notes, analyze data, and place their research findings in the historic and contemporary context of the Anza Trail. There is no foreign language requirement for this project.